Resources

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All Scotland's Urban Past resources are available for you to download and use in your heritage projects, wherever you’re based.

We've compiled free resources to help you investigate how Scotland's towns and cities have changed over time.

New content is always being added, so keep an eye on this page for updates or sign up to our eNewsletter to be the first to hear about newly added resources.

Do you have a memory or story about a place which you'd like to share? Then why not contribute to our online crowd sourcing platform which allows you to share pictures, sketches, facts and memories of a place with others through the National Record of the Historic Environment.
There are many ways you can raise awareness of your project, upcoming event or community group. These include the use of social media, email newsletters, blog creation and delivering presentations.
The social history of places is fascinating, and gathering factual histories and personal stories will likely inform, enrich and enliven your project. Talking to people who wish to share their memories will bring together unique stories and first-hand experiences, feelings and attitudes of the past.
Photography plays a big part in many urban heritage projects, and whether you've just got a new camera and are looking to learn some new photography techniques or have been shooting for a while and want to master some old ones, here you will find some resources on how to take the perfect picture.
Here you will find guides and associated resources related to reading and recording buildings and urban spaces. Our guidance notes have been prepared to help persons with no previous, or only limited, experience of reading and recording buildings and urban spaces.
Here you will find links to a range of online and paper resources to help you get started with your research. Many of the resources will be available in your local library, your nearest reference library or archive. Increasingly, online resources can be accessed remotely, mostly free of charge.
You may have opportunities to present your group’s work at a variety of events. This document is intended to help you plan, prepare and practise your presentation, so that you will feel more at ease when you deliver it.