Things Ain't What They Used To Be: Dark Pasts of Places (Part I)

Submitted by SarahManavis on Thu 05 Oct 2017

SUP's Frances Mann takes us through the eerie history of some of Scotland's well known buildings and places

Year Two Evaluation Report, executive summary

Research Scotland was commissioned in March 2015 by Historic Environment Scotland (HES) to provide evaluation support for the Scotland’s Urban Past (SUP) over the five-year delivery period of the programme. This evaluation report focuses on the first two years of delivery.

Friends of St John's Tower, Ayr

Revealing the hidden story of a local landmark.

Knightsridge Adventure Project, The Vennie, Livingston

Telling the story of our skate park.

About Scotland's Urban Past

Town centres, historic buildings, the street you work in, your local park, the artwork around you – what is it that makes our urban environments unique and important to you?

Scotland's Urban Past is a five-year nationwide project about the history of Scotland's towns and cities, led by Historic Environment Scotland, supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund.

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Robert Gray Sculptor

Robert Gray established 1850, office, showyard and works at 335a St. Vincent Street, Glasgow. [Post Office Glasgow Directory for 1922-23]

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Fairfield Farm House

"The former farmhouse of the Fairfield Farm reflects the sites agricultural use prior to its incorporation in the original park design of John Honeyman in 1883. Category listed the farmhouse c.1800 which predates the park is a simple one and a half storey building, constructed in random rubble blond sandstone with a slate roof. Symmetrical single storey pavilion wings with open verandas supported on finely detailed cast iron columns were added shortly after the park was established. Their original purpose was to provide Ladies and Gentlemen's 'waiting rooms'. Today the site is used by local people and community groups developing the Fairfield Community Market" [Elder Park Heritage Trail, GCC]

Posted by Colin Quigley on 30-10-2017

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Christmas Eve 1922

According to the Glasgow Herald dated 26th Dec 1922 "the memorial was erected to the memory of 1122 Govan men who made the supreme sacrifice". It was unveiled in front of a crowd of over 10,000 on Sunday 24th December 1922 by Major the Right Hon. Lord Blythswood M.V.O who said "the memorial was erected by the working men of Govan and he thought it illustrated the feeling of brotherly love and comradeship which had been a characteristic of the inhabitants of Glasgow". The Herald describes the memorial as follows: "It is Scotch Baronial in style and is built of silver grey granite, rising to a height of 22ft. The memorial is octagonal in plan and is set on three steps, each of the corners are round columns, their spiral strap work terminating at the top with thistle ornament. The principle battles of the war are carved on angled panels [Ypres, Somme, Mons, Falkland Is., Jutland, Zeebruge, Loos, Paschendale, Galipoli, Palestine, Salonica, Mesopotamia], the front panel has a bronze plate set in, with the Govan coat of arms on the upper part and the dedicatory inscription on the lower part. [ERECTED IN MEMORY OF THE MEN OF GOVAN WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WAR 1914-1919] Heads representing the men of the Army and Navy are carved on four of the cornice corners. Along the battlemented top rises an octagonal column surmounted by the Scottish lion holding a shield on which is carved a cross of St. Andrew. All the work was carried out by Robt. Gray sculptor, Glasgow. The memorial was formally handed over to the Pearce Institute."

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Govan War Memorial

Commemorating military and merchant personnel who lost their lives in action during 1914-1918 conflict. The monument was designed and sculpted by Robert Gray, Glasgow. It was unveiled in 1922.

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The Elizabeth Lodge

Was DEMOLISHED (not an option in choices, could not find a similar word to describe this, nor this word)

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Former Clothing Outlet

Former clothing outlet

Posted by Yolanda McCall on 21-10-2017

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Queensferry Crossing completion

Working as a Steward on Inchcolm Island the last two years I saw the last parts of the pieces being added to the new crossing and this year its opening.

Posted by R.P.Moran on 17-09-2017

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R.P. Moran

Working as a Steward on Inchcolm Island last year I regularly passed by the Forth Bridge. Later last year I came across old photos of my Great Aunt who had been out there too.

Posted by R.P.Moran on 17-09-2017

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Belvidere Primary School

This school is not Bellshill Public School that was at the top of North Road. This is Belvidere three generations of my family attended the school from the 1930's until it closed just short of it.s centenary.

Posted by Andrew C on 12-09-2017

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Airshaft

Removed during opencast works

Posted by Alan Wilson on 29-08-2017

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K6 PHONE BOX, NITHSDALE STREET, GLASGOW

Based in relatively open area and in fairly good condition apart from weathering. No sign of vandalism but could do with looking after. It must be from before the 50's since it has the English (Tudor) crown rather than the Scottish Crown which was used after that time.

Posted by antaeus on 19-08-2017

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Research

Avictimofamuder in 1951lived in this street no 18.assailant hanged

Posted by Martiboy on 31-07-2017

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Dr Thomas Wharrie was the original owner of this house.

The deeds to this property were found up in the attic of the house dated from 1813. This property on Muir Street was probably built by Dr Thomas Wharrie, and it was even built before the reconstruction and upgrade of the Hamilton Palace, which competed in the year 1842. When you take a wee drive past the house at Muir Street, then think of this, apart from the museum which is on the opposite side of the road and on the same street, you are looking at one of Hamilton’s oldest and inhabited buildings. The document was written in ‘Old Scots’ and when transcribed it stated that the house was purchased or built by Dr Thomas Wharrie on the 17th of September 1813. The document was proof of ownership of the house and it laid out the boundaries of the land and garden. The great thing I find about this 204-year-old land certificate is, when this was written, it also takes in to account other people who lived in houses surrounding this building. The document stated that in 1813 the house had attached offices with a yard. On the east side of the house the closest neighbour was a man named George Ward and there was a hedge separating both houses, and to the south of the garden was Common Green. On the west of the house, the next property was owned by a man named Roger Croft. The annual payments on the house in 1813 was seventeen shillings and three pence Sterling. The local town clerk in 1813 was Archibald Hamilton and he stamped the document, while a man named John Reid also witnessed the signing. So, as I have stated, I found that the house was once owned by a prominent family in Hamilton that went by the name of Wharrie. This family were a very well-known one in the town, and they had many friends in many high places, Dr Dykes of Woodhead was an example of this upper-class Hamilton Hierarchy. I had never heard of the Wharrie family and even the name is not a common one in the area. This was when I decided that I was going to research this family.

Posted by Garry McCallum on 30-07-2017

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Keith's Buildings of Cadzow Street

from Historic Hamilton by Garry McCallum Page 4 Rations during World War Two were in force, and Keith’s was no exception to the rules, however, the rules were bent a little. In 1947 Messrs. James Keith Ltd got into a spot of bother for selling too much Whisky to Bothwell Golf Club and they were told that they would be obliged to restrict the quantity of whisky sold to the Bothwell Golf Club owing to recent regulations. The Convenor submitted a statement of the quantities of whisky supplied to the Club in the years 1939 and 1946 which showed the Club had obtained from Messrs. Keith, a larger amount of whisky in 1946 than they had purchased in 1939. The allocation now offered to the Club would be 18 bottles of whisky per month or roughly 4 bottles a week. It was agreed to conserve the supplies and to ensure that there should be a fair distribution amongst members, to restrict the sale of whisky to one bottle on Wednesday and three on Saturdays. It was also agreed that no large whiskies be supplied. John Keith was also a Major with the 6th Battalion, the Cameronians (Scottish Rifles) During the 1st world war 1914-18 was wounded at Festubert. John H Keith was the new owner of Keith’s buildings and he continued to run the family business and he was to be the last member of the Keith family to be Managing Director of this family owned company. John H Keith continued to run the family business up until 1961 when it was taken over by Messrs David Sandeman of Pall Mall London. I would take a wild guess that the company of Keith’s was sold due to declining sales and competition from the new supermarkets and corner shops emerging all over the local area.

Posted by Garry McCallum on 09-07-2017

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The Story of Torhead By Garry McCallum - Historic Hamilton.

Torheads Farm and Lake. By Garry McCallum – Historic Hamilton. The large lands, once owned by the Watson family, stretched over 2000 acres all the way from Earnock past Torheads and down to Fairhill and Meikle Earnock and at Torheads, there is very little written about this part of Sir John Watson’s land. I wanted to tell you the story about the Torheads lake but when I started to research the lands of Torhead I thought that I would do this area of Hamilton some justice, and tell you about the people who once lived here. Torheads Lake takes its name after Torheads Farm, which was a farm steading situated south of Hamilton Town Centre and the farmland stretched across 57 acres and it was surrounded by fields and woodland as far as the eye could see. The first owner that I have found was a farmer called William Gardiner who was born on the sixteenth of September 1810, to parents William Gardiner Snr and Janet Hart. William Gardiner who from 1841, owned the farm and he lived here with his wife Margaret Wilson and their nine children who were called William, Janet, Margaret, John, Jane, Andrew, James, Robert and Bethia. It seems that William was an outgoing social person, who liked to take part in things within his community. One thing that he always took part in was the local Annual Ploughing matches, where in February 1849, he judged a Ploughing Match in Hamilton and later on in 1856, he appears in the Glasgow Hearld as coming in 4th place in a ploughing competition where the Duke of Hamilton was in attendance handing out medals to the winners on this day. William Gardiner had owned Torheads from at least 1841 up until 1863, where things seem to take a turn for the worse for William as in April 1863, he files for Bankruptcy and he loses his Farm at Torheads. At the age of 53, poor William after working at the farm his whole life is left with nothing. Torheads Farm was later overseen by the Heirs of D. Marshall Esq and was factored by Thomas Dykes of Hamilton. After 1863, the trail goes cold and I can’t find any further info on what became of William and his family. Moving on, the next family that I found living at Torheads was the Wilson Family. In 1865, the farm steading was leased to John Wilson who was a man from Avondale in Lanarkshire and he took over Torheads and became the new tenant farmer. John Wilson who was married to Elizabeth Blackwood leased Torheads from 1865, up until his death 17th May 1884. In the time that John and his wife Elizabeth lived on the farm, they had six children born at Torheads who were John, James, Elizabeth, Ellen, Robert & Euphemina. As Sir John Watson started to extend his coal mining empire, he snapped up all of the land and properties around Midstonehall and Earnock, which began with the purchase of the Midstonehall Estate in April 1871. Sir John Watson wanting to put his own stamp on Midstonehall House then changed it's name to Neilston House taking the name from a nearby Farm Steading which was to be then locally known as the Old Neilston House. Sir John Watson moved on and extended his land portfolio and bought the land at Torheads and in the year 1873, he arranged for a water supply pipe to be run from Neisland Mansion House to the Torheads marshy land which surrounded Torheads Farm at this time. The area was formerly known as the “Tally Ho” and it was transformed into a small lake. When the lake was constructed, a varied selection of trees were planted to form an arboretum on both sides of the glen and a rockery was also created to give it a much grander appearance. I have to mention that the name “Tally Ho” could possibly have been used in reference to a hunting ground, but this is just my thoughts on it. The Tor Lake was more than likely designed by a Dundee man named David Mitchell, who was a former gardener of the Duke of Hamilton. David Mitchell had also helped build the beautiful gardens at the Grand Neilsland House.

Posted by Garry McCallum on 09-07-2017

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Keith's Buildings of Cadzow Street

from Historic Hamilton by Garry McCallum Page 6 The doors of Keith’s were opened back up again, but not to be a delicatessen or whisky bond some of the people who used the building were Netty and Ian Kane. Netty, used the building as a Café and Amusements whilst Ian, ran a Taxi firm from it and I have heard that Ian Kane was the first person in Scotland to own a Black Hackney Cab. There was also a clothes shop and Fancy dress on the top floor of Keith’s and it was later used as a gym. The doors closed again for the last time at the end of the 80s and would remain closed. In December 1994 workmen were carrying out maintenance on paving slabs at the side of Keith’s and when they lifted the slabs they made a shocking discovery. They found themselves staring into a very deep cellar which took you down to the basement of the building where they kept old Whisky barrels. This was found to be one of Three Cellars deemed unsafe by the council and the roofs of them had become quite dilapidated. If a car had to park on the pavement at the side of Keith’s then it would have fallen straight through. After a series of Meetings with Armando Russo, the council agreed to fill in the cellars with concrete to avoid the roof collapsing as it was a danger to the public. In 2006, the building itself was found to be in poor condition after lying empty since the early 90’s and it was agreed that no less than £500,000 would be set aside for possible spending on Keith’s Buildings. This money was funded by the Hamilton Ahead Initiative, run by the Town Council. It is unclear if this money was ever spent on Keith’s Buildings, but when you put things into perspective, this is a 117-year-old building and it still has a lot of potential to offer to our town so I would imagine it would be in their best interest to invest some money into it. Today, Keith’s is admired by many people who pass by it and the grand old building is still owned by the late Armando Russo’s company Associated Rentals. I have done some research to find out what exactly is happening with Keith’s and I am pleased to say that there is currently an offer of Intent to purchase by a man named William Campbell. I don’t know who this man is, but I would assume he is some sort of developer. Keith’s is a Grade A building and it is protected, so Mr Campbell if you are reading this story of our historic building - that is known as Keith’s buildings, then can I ask, please talk to South Lanarkshire Council and see if an agreement can be reached to give this historic building to the People of Hamilton. This building would make a perfect Hub for our community. Written by Garry McCallum Historic Hamilton.

Posted by Garry McCallum on 09-07-2017

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Keith's Buildings of Cadzow Street

from Historic Hamilton by Garry McCallum Page 5 The new owners tried to make something of Keith’s and they also kept the name, but only 6 years later they closed the doors on Hamilton’s first Super Market. This was the end of an 118-year era passed down from father to son and the 1970s were just around the corner, what was to become of this grand old building? Messrs David Sandeman closed Keith’s and they stated that it was no longer possible for them to trade from Cadzow Street because of excessive burdens in the form of Selective Employment Tax, Heavy Local Rates and ‘other government impositions’. (Nothing has changed in 2017) They did try to find other smaller premises in Hamilton but without success. The manager of Keith’s at the time was called Alex Wylie and he had worked for Keith’s for 30 years and because of his great work at Keith’s, his job was safeguarded and he was transferred to the sister store at Bothwell. I asked you what was to become of Keith’s? The building was eventually bought by businessman Armando Russo and his Associated Rentals Company. Russo held substantial properties all around the town centre and still to this day, his company owns Keith’s and many more properties in Hamilton and for reasons unknown to many, Russo owned derelict buildings which he refused to sell. One example of this was the old derelict Regal Cinema, this took the Hamilton Town Council Ten years of negotiations to buy it from Russo. The old Regal was later demolished and its land turned into a car park.

Posted by Garry McCallum on 09-07-2017

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Keith's Buildings of Cadzow Street

from Historic Hamilton by Garry McCallum Page 3 Around the 1890s the family saw a gap in the market for affordable whisky and in 1901 they started to produce their very own. They used the cellars at Cadzow Glen as the whisky bond. The whisky was stored here for a minimum of ten years to mature. When the ten years had passed, they started to bottle their whisky and production commenced on the 30th of August 1911 - they gave it the appropriate name of ‘Keith’s Cadzow Blend’ or KCB for short. Some of the people who worked at the whisky bond were Frank McGrory who was the Blender, Eddie Summers who was the store man and the well-known Beef McTaggart was the Lorry Driver. Henry Keith wanted to make his whisky a worldwide product, and around the beginning of the twentieth century, he was advertising all over the United Kingdom. Adverts were in all the local and national papers and the adverts stated, “Possibly the oldest whisky in the world offered at this price” The company of James Keith was still thriving through both world wars. Henry Shanks Keith had died on 9th of July 1944. The business was passed to his son John thus making way for the third generation of this family run the business.

Posted by Garry McCallum on 09-07-2017

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Keith's Buildings of Cadzow Street

from Historic Hamilton by Garry McCallum Page 2 As I stated, Keith or Keith’s Buildings as it is called was named after its owner, the wealthy businessman and lord provost of Hamilton, Sir Henry Shanks Keith. Sir Henry Keith, had chosen this site to build his property because, at the turn of the 20th century, Cadzow Street was the best place to go for shopping and Cadzow Street was at the heart of everything in the town and not to mention it was the finest thoroughfare in the burgh. When you entered Hamilton from Glasgow, Keith’s department store was the first shop that caught your eye and the store became the finest delicatessen in Hamilton and at the turn of the 20th century, Cadzow Street had more to offer than its Quarry Street neighbour. The exact address for this building is 84- 90 Cadzow Street and the building itself was purposely designed to be a large commercial property, with its design of continental and mostly Parisian and Viennese styles and looking at it from Cadzow Bridge, it really stood out from the rest of Cadzow Street. It is built to approximately a square plan and above the bridge level it has a 2 storey and dormer-less attic and it has 4 storeys below the bridge level. The building also has its own lift installed inside it and on each floor, below ground level was a store room where the Keith’s kept their stock. When the business was in full operation and because of the size of the building they had to transfer money around quite quickly, so they used a pulley system attached to the ceiling where the money would be put in plastic cylinders and transported all over the building. On the Cadzow Street entrance, there are 3 wide key blocked segmental arches, linked by segment headed doorways and below on the ground level, there is a segmental terraced space with one arch. Like many of Hamilton’s buildings, the stone is a red colour and would have been brought in from of the many neighbouring Quarry’s that surrounded Hamilton and Lanarkshire. Keith’s store offered a fine choice of foods, it was run as a delicatessen for a time and you could say it was Hamilton’s first supermarket. The shop sold fine meats, steaks, gammon and all poultry. They imported meat from Ireland. They also sold tea, coffee, dried fruit and fresh fruit. They were also Wine importers, wholesale & retail grocers.

Posted by Garry McCallum on 09-07-2017

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Keith's Buildings of Cadzow Street

from Historic Hamilton by Garry McCallum Page 1 I am always being asked about the big building at the side of Cadzow Bridge and what it was used for. This red sandstone building is called Keith’s buildings, and it is one of Hamilton’s old surviving properties, that has graced Cadzow Glen since its construction was complete in 1903. The Keith family business was started in Hamilton by James Keith, who was a grocer, who moved to Hamilton from Holytown in 1856. He had started his business in Holytown in 1849 and when he moved to Hamilton - presumably to grow his business, he opened his small grocers shop at 78 Cadzow Street, he was renting the shop and house above from a well-known surgeon called Dr Wharrie. The Keith’s would have their business in Cadzow Street for the next 111 years. By the year 1859, James Keith had entered the Town Council and was now fully involved in how Hamilton was run so this would have given him a huge advantage over his competitors in Cadzow Street. In modern times, we have seen this same sort of influence with a certain nightclub owner. It has, however, been documented that not only was James Keith a great employer but he was a man of great nature, who was Kind and well respected by many. In 1895 James Keith would later move up the political ladder and become the towns, Lord Provost. James Keith’s only son, who was called Henry Shanks Keith, had taken over the family business when his father died on the 21st of March 1901. He was responsible for the grand sandstone building that we see today. The construction of Keith’s buildings was done in conjunction with the widening of Cadzow Bridge and it was designed by Bonn & Baptie structural engineers. It began in the year 1901 and was completed by 1903. The grandeur of the building can be best seen when you stroll under Cadzow Bridge along the Glen, however, when you walk down Cadzow Street the entrance to the building just looks like a normal old sandstone shop and it fits in nicely with the rest of the buildings on that side of the street. Thankfully, this Hamilton building is Grade A listed and it can’t be demolished, but on a sadder note, it is now just rotting away.

Posted by Garry McCallum on 09-07-2017

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The Hamilton Reference Library

The Hamilton Reference Library is contained within Hamilton Town House Library, located at 102 Cadzow Street. Until 2009 this part of the library was unknown to me. I discovered this treasure trove when researching my family tree. I was researching my Di & Granny’s side of the family when I was directed to the Carnegie Room. The first thing that you notice in the Reference Library, is how peaceful this upper floor is and even though it is usually busy, there is a sense of respect for other people who are studying or using computers and the quietness of the place is really relaxing. Hamilton Town House is jointly operated by South Lanarkshire Council and South Lanarkshire Leisure & Culture. The building contains both the town's main public hall (formerly known as Hamilton Town Hall) and public library, as well as various Council departments including licensing, registration and community learning. The building, although appearing to be one, was constructed in stages over a 21-year period. The library was opened by Andrew Carnegie in 1907, the adjacent Town House offices were opened by King George V in 1914 and finally the Town Hall completed the building in 1928. In 2002, the entire building was closed for a massive refurbishment project, costing £9 million. This was required to bring the internal facilities to current building regulation standards (including modern lifts), whilst also restoring the exterior of this A-listed building. In August 2004, the new integrated Town House complex was revealed to the public, with an official opening by HRH Princess Anne in September. The library won two awards: the "Architect Meets Practicality Award" for libraries of significant architectural interest that are practical and user-friendly and the "Mary Finch Accessibility Award" for the library which most addresses access issues from physical through to cultural barriers. The resources are incredible, and include the following: Local Authority / Council minutes and reports dating to the 1600s, a section of the Hamilton Estate Papers, a historic collection of over 2000 indexed photographs, a large postcard collection, historic and contemporary electoral registers, Valuation rolls, Hamilton Advertiser and other local newspapers in print bound volume and on micro-film, a collection of fiction and poetry by local authors and about Lanarkshire, a collection of historic and geographical guides relating to Lanarkshire, a large collection of historic and contemporary maps covering Lanarkshire, Census reports on micro-film, free access within the library to the family history website Ancestry.com. There are 15 Internet-linked PCs available in the ActiveIT suite, in addition to free WiFi throughout the building. and regular displays relating to the history of Hamilton and Lanarkshire. One important thing that I would like to mention is the staff who work at the Reference Library. They are extremely knowledgeable and helpful. One real gem is long-time library assistant Angela Ward whose knowledge of Hamilton is unrivalled. The staff handle family research requests continuously from local and international enquirers. On a more personal note, the Hamilton Advertiser copies that are kept here in storage areas are the last remaining copies ever to be printed of each year and cannot be reproduced in original form. In this digital age, I would like to see the Hamilton Advertiser archived in this way, future proofing the collection for future generations. The collection of Hamilton Advertisers is so large, it would take a lot of time and money for this to happen. These records have preserved the history of Hamilton week by week since 1856. I firmly believe that they should be digitised for future generations to read. Just think that in 100 years from now, someone will be reading what we did today as history! Let’s try put a plan in action and come up with an idea to get funding to have Hamilton’s history stored and made available online.

Posted by Garry McCallum on 09-07-2017

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Residence

This building is part of a larger series of architectural developments in the area between Leith Walk and Easter Road, undertaken between 1904 and 1906.

Posted by NH1648 on 04-07-2017

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Craigston Park

Four bedroomed modern house, two storeys, one of eight in a quiet cul-de-sac adjoining the cycle way between Dunfermline and Queen Margaret Hospital, built in 2001.

Posted by Jean Barclay on 04-07-2017

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Hilton Wynd

this is my home, i have lived here since 2014

Posted by Y.A.C. Caelan on 04-07-2017

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St Modan's Church

There is no doubt that for around 70 years St. Modan’s played an important role in the life of Falkirk and its Bairns but by 1985 the financial demands of building maintenance were proving too burdensome for the congregation. On 19th October 1986 Rev. Ron Smith conducted the last service and the congregation merged with the Old Parish Church. In 1991 the current development of 12 flats came up for sale.

Posted by Jim Edward on 02-07-2017

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St Modans Church

nnnnnnnn

Posted by Jim Edward on 02-07-2017

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Granny's Farm

Back in the 1960's this farm was derelict. I vaguely remember the house ruins and, I think, a petrol pump. We played there every day. It was commonly known as Granny's Farm. It was eventually demolished and gave us children a wonderful grassy and, to us, a hilly play area. In the late sixties Granny's Farm was developed for new houses.

Posted by Feen on 13-06-2017

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Gate Lodge Bank Street

This small lodge located in Mid Calder was the the home of my great great grandparents (pictured). My great grandparents moved in later and cared for his parents. My father played in the garden as a child and my sister and I have visited this wonderful stone lodge. Many Reids lived and worked in Mid Calder. While many have remained in Scotland some descendents have emigrated to New Zealand and America, each returning to this lodge in this small village for a memory, a photo, a love of shared Scottish heritage and a wee nip of whiskey.

Posted by Chrissie Reid on 13-05-2017

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Forre Town Hall

Does anyone have information on the following events in the Town Hall: Talk by Oscar Wilde Talk by " Lord Haw- Haw " Performance by Silver Beatles ( later The Beatles)

Posted by Nick Molnar on 08-05-2017

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Forre Town Hall

Does anyone have information on the following events in the Town Hall: Talk by Oscar Wilde Talk by " Lord Haw- Haw " Performance by Silver Beatles ( later The Beatles)

Posted by Nick Molnar on 08-05-2017

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A quiet matinee screening in 1986

I saw films at the Victoria cinema very occasionally in its later years. I went there one extremely wet & cold Saturday afternoon in early January 1986 - the film was John Boorman's 'The Emerald Forest'. As I went in, just before the start, I noticed that I was the only person in the audience, and the usherette taking the tickets told me "It's not nearly as good as it's made out to be!" Perhaps she thought she'd get the afternoon off if no-one wanted to watch the film but I had already paid for my ticket, and anyway someone else came in afterwards. So she had to stay on duty while the film was screened for an audience of two. I think the 'Vic's' best days were already behind it by then.

Posted by Colin McLeod on 18-04-2017

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changes needed to website page

From my earlier submission today (28 March 2017), please note that three changes require to be made to the web page: 1. It currently reads "Helensburgh, 13 Abercromby Street East, Hapland". It should read "Helensburgh, 13 East Abercromby Street, St Andrews". 2. The alternative name of "48 Charlotte Street" should be deleted, as this is the address of a neighbouring house. 3. The location of the house is shown incorrectly on the map. It should be 30421 83051 Please let me know if you need further assistance.

Posted by Stewartnbl on 28-03-2017

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mistake in listing

From 1985 to 1998 my wife and I owned the house at 13 East Abercromby Street, Helensburgh; as far as I am aware the house has always been known as St Andrews and it still has that name. A few years after I bought the house I received a letter saying that the house had been given B listed status. However when I read the description of the house it seemed to me to refer to one of our neighbours, namely a house called Hapland which is located at 48 Charlotte Street, Helensburgh. When our house had been built in the 1920s its next-door neighbour to the west was Hapland. However in the years after the Second World War two modern houses had been built between us in the grounds of Hapland. Consequently I decided to enquire further about the listing. Eventually I was put in touch with the appropriate department at Historic Scotland, and I explained the situation. They asked me to send in a photograph of our house, which I did, and several months later I received a letter from Historic Scotland to say that a mistake had indeed been made and that my house at 13 East Abercromby Street was no longer listed. I hope that this clarifies the situation.

Posted by Stewartnbl on 28-03-2017

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Seafield Primary School

The school was built in 1955 and between 2015 and 2017 it has been undergoing a £6 000 000 refurbishment programme. The upgrade work has been carried out by Morrisons Construction and the school now has new windows, extra insulation, a new roof and a new heating system. The whole school has been redecorated inside and out. The former nursery building is now a hub for the older children. A new nursery /P1 accommodation block now stands where a temporary music room block used to be.

Posted by Angela M on 15-03-2017

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St Mary's Star of the Sea Presbytery 1860

One of the most famous examples of Protestant reaction in the history of St Mary’s occurred in 1861, during the building of the presbytery. Fr John Noble, O.M.I. (1859-69), was in charge of proceedings, and during the work, a remarkable discovery was made: "It appears that the architect one day discovered in the course of inspection that a wall was out of plumb. Without hesitation, he ordered the wall to be demolished and rebuilt. He was amazed to discover that a cavity had been made in the wall enclosing a strong box, which contained a parchment signed by some prominent citizens who put on record for posterity their rooted objection to this incursion of papists. The discovery was soon the subject of laughter and even their co-religionists joined in the hilarity provoked by their identity and had won for themselves an unenvied notoriety." - taken from Fr John Noble by W.F. O'Connor

Posted by Frances Mann on 09-03-2017

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St Mary's first Oblate Priest d 1869

Fr John Noble, O.M.I. (d. 1869). The first Oblate Superior of St Mary’s, Star of the Sea (1859 –1869). Fr Noble was also one of the main preachers during the Oblate missions in Leith in 1850 and 1852, before the church was built. The Oblates of Mary Immaculate were known for their work in some of the poorest industrial urban areas across Britain. They also had bases in Leeds, Crewe, Liverpool, Galashiels (although only briefly) among others. One of his main tasks when he came back to Leith in 1859 was to oversee the building of the new presbytery and reduce the debt of the parish. On August 19th, 1860 Fr Noble described the state of the mission and his experiences in the first few months of Oblate settlement in Leith: "Since the Oblate Fathers’ arrival in Leith, there has been a marked improvement among our Catholics. A large number of men and women who previously never came to church, now frequent the sacraments at least monthly. We have received many converts. Last Sunday I baptised an educated man of thirty years of age, and next week I will have another adult to baptise. It is a real consolation to baptise adults in Scotland for the Presbyterians don’t baptise now and when we receive converts we are morally certain that baptism will have its entire effect. " In 1867, whilst walking in Leith docks late at night, Fr Noble fell into the water and drowned. A policeman had seen him earlier being followed by two men shouting, “Priest, forgive us our sins,” and other insults. This incident became the grounds for suspicion that he was pushed into the water, but no other records support this view. He was buried in a vault below the Lady Altar and today a memorial to him stands at the back of the church.

Posted by Frances Mann on 09-03-2017

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St Mary's Star of the Sea, interior

Church opened in 1854. The layout from 1854 – 1910 had the altar at the west end of the church, in what is now the Cry chapel. Original High Altar was wooden and flanked by statues of St Joseph and the Sacred Heart. Two statues of kneeling angels also at either side of the High Altar. Wooden altar rails across the front of the main Altar. The South Aisle had the Lady Altar at the west end of the church, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary. Statue of Our Lady positioned on the altar. Stone pulpit situated to the south of the Altar, outside altar rails. Organ gallery in east end of church. In 1895, Fr.Gaughren, O.M.I. starts work on new North Aisle at the cost of £2000. North Aisle completed in 1900. Two hundred more seats fitted into church. Six confessionals also installed in North Aisle

Posted by Frances Mann on 09-03-2017

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My House

Built in 1874 as part of a terrace (then Robertson Terrace) 33-41 Bank Street. Nos 35-41 currently derelict with planning permission for conversion back to dwelling houses having previously been converted to offices. House has many original Victorian features, including cornicing and ceiling roses, some doors, and balustrade. We have carried out some extension and modernisation. Two storey dwelling. Original rooms are 2 public rooms and 3 bedrooms. 1949 extension houses kitchen (since updated) and WC, with large bathroom (with 1949 suite) and office on mezzanine floor. Large split-level greenhouse to rear, built partly on WW2 air raid shelter, now potting shed!

Posted by jeanepark on 20-02-2017

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Queensberry Monument

The O.S names for Dumfriesshire of the 1850s states it is 'a stone pillar standing on a small square pedestal, about 7 feet high, surrounded by an iron railing (this no longer exists) . The pillar is a ?? column of about 30 feet high. On one side of the pedestal is a device representing a female figure leaning on an urn and on another side of the same is the following inscription " This column sacred to the memory of Charles Duke of Queensberry and ?? was erected by the County of Dumfries as a monument to their ??? for the character of that illustrious nobleman whose exalted virtues rendered him the ornament (?) of Society and whose numerous acts of public beneficience and private charity endeared him to this County" Ob 22nd Oct 1778'

Posted by crosshill1 on 20-01-2017

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Queensberry Monument

Dating from the turn of the 18th/19th centuries the monument to the 3rd Duke of Queensberry was sited in Queensberry Square. In the 1930s however it was removed to stand in front of the County Building in English Street. It was returned to Queensberry Square in 1990 where it remains.

Posted by crosshill1 on 20-01-2017

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Hospitalfield Studios from 1901 onward

The studios at Hospitalfield were built in 1901 in preparation for the first students to arrive at the Allan-Fraser Art College. The College was founded by the Hospitalfield estate’s last private owner, the artist and philanthropist Patrick Allan-Fraser,who died in 1890 and left a bequest that dedicated his home at Hospitalfield to be transformed into a residential art school. Orientated to make use of the North light, the studios were built with drawing and painting students in mind. The quality of this light is captured in many paintings by the Scottish artist James Cowie, who lived and worked at Hospitalfield from 1937-1948. By this time, the site’s purpose had changed from the four-year art College outlined in Allan-Fraser’s bequest to a residency centre for students from Glasgow School of Art, Edinburgh College of Art, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art, and Gray’s School of Art, but the studios were still actively used by Cowie and the art students. The artist and teacher to succeed Cowie at Hospitalfield was Ian Fleming, who lived and worked there from 1948-1954. It is said that Fleming used to paint one of the walls of the studio the exact same colour as the walls of the Royal Scottish Academy. As so many of Fleming’s paintings focus on tone rather than colour, the specificity of tonal interaction between painting and wall that he sought to achieve speaks to the level of detail through which he considered his work. Through the years, Hospitalfield’s studios have provided a space for hundreds of artists to experiment with new techniques, expand their practices, and enjoy a sense of camaraderie and community. This incubator of creativity can be visited by the public on open weekends and continues to be used by artists today. For references and more see: George Hay, ed, The Book of Hospitalfield: Memorial of Patrick Allan-Fraser H.R.S.A of Hospitalfield (Privately Printed for the Hospitalfield Trust, 1894). “The Hospitalfield Art Scheme”, The Courier, 31 August 1901, 6. Oil paintings by James Cowie and Ian Fleming in public collections through www.artuk.org http://hospitalfield.org.uk

Posted by P Beardmore on 11-01-2017

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Woodilee shelters

Think they're gone now, flattened by the new building.

Posted by oliveg on 30-12-2016

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Aubrey Boating Pond

A boating pond, used by Largs Model Boat club. According to aerial photographs and map data this artifical pond appeared post 1960. Ordance Survey map 1:25, 000 surveyed 1895 names site as 'Football Ground.' This name disappears by Ordnance Survey map 1:25, 000 revised 1909.

Posted by Fiona Watson on 07-12-2016

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History

Built in 1886

Posted by WendyM on 26-11-2016

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Gashouse or Herries Close

Dumfriesshire OS Name Book describes Gashouse Close and gives its old name of Herries Close in 1857, 'a long irregular close leading from High St to Shakespeare St. It is paved & drained. The houses are of an indifferent class 2 storeys in height and occupied by working people.'

Posted by crosshill1 on 10-11-2016

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Paddy's Close

Dumfriesshire OS Name Book (mid 1850s) describes Paddy's Close - a short, narrow and irregular close, indifferently paved and dirty. The houses are one storey in height and of indifferent class occupied by workmen. It originally linked English St with Shakespeare St, emerging opposite St Andrews RC chapel (later cathedral). Because it would have provided a short cut to the chapel it may be why it was called Paddy's Close.

Posted by crosshill1 on 09-11-2016

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Bee Hive Close

Dumfriesshire OS Name Books for 1857 describes the close as 'Leading North Easterly from Queensberry St towards Loreburn St. A narrow close open only at Queensberry St. It is paved & drained. The houses are 2 storeys high occupied by working people. ' The Bee Hive Inn as 'An old public house 2 storeys high occupied by A. Beatie. The property of Miss Young.There are some stables attached capable of keeping 8 horses.'

Posted by crosshill1 on 10-11-2016

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Turnpike Close

At 85 High St,. Dumfriesshire OS Name Books of the mid 19th century describe it as 'a short, wide close well paved and drained. The houses are of 3 storeys in height and in good repair. In it are two public houses. One of the pubs was Turnpike Inn'. The same document states as 'a house 3 storeys high and in good repair. The lower apartment is occupied as a public house called the Turnpike Inn hence the name of the close.'

Posted by crosshill1 on 10-11-2016

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Peerie Foxes

Day care of children since 2007. Runs from 4-6. Before 2007 this was an accountants - Stevenson & Co. Previously a bakers known as Malcolmson's (ovens in property number 4). Malcolmson's closed in 2014.

Posted by Fiona Watson on 02-11-2016

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9 Knab Road

Semi-detached house, built after WW1 as part of the Homes for Heroes campaign as Shetland's first set of council housing. Each house has a generous garden in order for the inhabitants to grow vegetables to support their family. The original cellar of the house was converted into an air raid shelter during WW2.

Posted by Esther on 02-11-2016

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The Long Close

Described in Dumfriesshire O.S Name Books of the 1850s as " A tolerably wide close leading from High St to Irish St. It is paved and drained and lighted with gas. The houses are from one to three storeys high, most of which are well constructed and in good repair. In it are a public house and a smithy."

Posted by crosshill1 on 02-11-2016

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Age of building at 28 English Street

This building is smaller than its 19th century neighbours. It has a close to the south of the building, commonly known as RAF Close due to the presence until 2016 of the RAFA club contained therein. There is a flat above the flower shop accessed via the close. Intriguingly there is a date of 1590 marked on the front of number 28 in a little niche at first floor level. If this is correct it would be the oldest building in Dumfries town centre. The close is possibly Bakehouse Close.

Posted by crosshill1 on 02-11-2016

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Royal Oak Close

Described in Dumfriesshire O.S Name Books of the 1850s as "A long & irregular close leading from High St to Irishe St - paved & drained. Houses from one to two storeys in height."

Posted by crosshill1 on 02-11-2016

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136 to 144 Queensberry St

136 to 144 Queensberry Street feature carved sandstone ornamentation above the ground floor windows and doors. The buildings contain shops at ground floor level with flatted accommodation above.

Posted by crosshill1 on 21-10-2016

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Anchor Inn Close

This close lies to the south of the building at 8 English Street. It was built in 1875-7 as a bank in the Italianate style. The OS Town Plan of 1893 shows this close gave access to Shakespeare St. It now appears to be private access to the rear of buildings on English Street and High Street

Posted by crosshill1 on 18-10-2016

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Caerlaverock Castle Close

On the far left of 113 High St, the Close is no longer a passageway to residential buildings nor a public causeway. Named after an inn The Caerlaverock Castle.

Posted by crosshill1 on 11-10-2016

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Black Horse Close

Named after The Black Horse Inn that stood here alongside homes within the close.

Posted by crosshill1 on 11-10-2016

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David Gavin's Ironmongers

A traditional ironmonger's with many interior wooden fittings e.g. shelves , till, counter and a wooden staircase at the back of the shop, on the S side of the building, beside the counter which runs N-S. The ground floor sells screws, nails, hand tools, paint and other supplies for DIY. Upstairs cookery equipment is sold. The front door has a bell, which "tings" when you enter. The shop floor is roughly rectangular. Behind the counter is a door which leads to a joining corridor with a large sliding wooden door on each side - to the street to the N and one onto a communal yard shared by the neighboring shop, a fish mongers called C-Fayer. The yard is used for selling plants in the spring/summer. At the western side of the yard is a low, long wooden shed running along the wall, with windows in the side facing the yard. A small wall separates this yard from McConechy's Tyre and Auto Centre car park to the SW. There is a display window either side of the front door, and S wall.

Posted by Fiona Watson on 07-10-2016

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Site of the old Cumbernauld Bowling Club

Old Cumbernauld Bowling Club: 1868 - 1969

Posted by Allen on 05-10-2016

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Cumbernauld Village Bakery

Cumbernauld Village Bakery at 66 Main Street was owned by William Watson, Walter Watson and Morrison Watson from 1880 to the 1940s.

Posted by Allen on 01-10-2016

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Rail Depot

Text here

Posted by Peigi on 01-10-2016

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42 Park Way

Family home built in 1958

Posted by ThomsonParkWay on 24-09-2016

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Cumbernauld Bowling Club

Opening in 1969 Source: 'A history of Cumbernauld bowling club 1979'

Posted by Allen on 25-09-2016

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Golden Eagle Hotel

This is the site of the Golden Eagle Hotel. In the 1970s a large section of wall fell away and the hotel was found to be structurally unsound. It was subsequently demolished having lasted only ten years.

Posted by Peggy on 24-09-2016

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Woolco Department Store

Woolco was a department store run by Woolworths. It was really thrilling for the people of Cumbernauld to get our first department store. Sadlya lot of the small stores were damaged by it's opening - Rosemary MacKenna.

Posted by Peggy on 24-09-2016

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former occupants

This house was owned and occupied during the late 1930's and 1940's by a Hispano Scottish family by the name of Blazquez McEwen. They came to Edinburgh as a result of the Spanish civil war. A number of high placed refugees from both sides of that war were given shelter in the house. One of the daughters of the family had her wedding reception in the garden to which a number of South American ambassadors attended. It subsequently became a home for the elderly.

Posted by John R Macdonald on 20-09-2016

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Coffee Close

This close links 164 High Street and 73 Queensberry Street Dumfries. Its name suggests there was a coffee shop at one or both ends of the close. There were dwellings within the close which remained inhabited until the mid-20th century when the residents were moved to housing estates on the outskirts of the town. Some buildings were demolished and others used for business purposes. The close is used as a short cut between the two streets.

Posted by crosshill1 on 05-09-2016

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Gashouse Close

This close runs from High Street to Shakespeare Street, where it emerges opposite a large car park. The close was formerly called Herries Close but when the gasworks was built on the site now occupied by the car park the name was changed to Gashouse Close.

Posted by crosshill1 on 05-09-2016

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Deansgate Nelson Street

Houses built on old church lands, Elizafield?

Posted by Wendy D Tremble on 02-09-2016

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Rebuilt school

Originally used as a school in 1960s, but then rebuilt in early 2000's.

Posted by Bryony on 02-09-2016

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Medievil Craft Club

This blacksmith/artist's workshop is the base for a craft club where early techniques are used to create artifacts of various eras such as Medieval or Viking. These techniques include metalwork, costume making, leather-work etc. Most of these items are used for re-enactments.

Posted by vikingmum on 02-09-2016

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Beehive Close

Beehive Close was demolished in the creation of Great King Street, Dumfries.

Posted by crosshill1 on 02-09-2016

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2016 development

In the summer of 2016, the playing fields of the college were covered with temporary classrooms as the school undergoes 2 years of re-development and upgrading.

Posted by vikingmum on 02-09-2016

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When a bridge across a railway becomes simply a road.

Glasgow Central Railway line was opened in 1896. Kirklee Station, junction and track, associated with this line, are long-since gone (closed to passenger traffic in 1939, and to freight in 1964). However, within the Botanic Gardens you can still see the old Botanics Station platforms and ventilation shafts where the track entered a tunnel, then further on the platforms where the track re-emerged at Kirklee Station, and these, together with the railing of the bridge for road traffic, are all that remain today. After leaving Kirklee Station the route divided, the main line curving N-E towards Maryhill Station, and a spur continuing N towards the Dawsholm Locomotive Works. This bridge parapet (pictured, on the S side of Kirklee Road, which used to cross the track) is just after the split, and marks the start of the Dawsholm spur.

Posted by Ewen Smith on 30-08-2016

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Barrowland Park Police Box

One of six Glibert Mackenzie Trench Mark II police boxes, designed in 1929, found in Glasgow today. The police box is made of pre-cast, reinforced concrete with a wooden door, all painted dark blue. The windows have metal frames and the glass in the central pane in the lower row is dark blue. The metal plaque attached to the south elevation of the police box reads : 'POLICE TELEPHONE / ICONIC GILBERT / MACKENZIE / TRENCH / POLICE BOX / MARK II DESIGN / SUPPLIED BY CIVIL DEFENCE AND / EMERGENCY SERVICE / PRESERVATION TRUST FOR / CALTON BARRAS ACTION PLAN / IN MEMORY OF JOSEPH GERALD DUMAN - AD ADSTRA'

Posted by Pixie on 21-08-2016

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Fountain to Monument, how Perth erected a memorial to Prince Albert

The statue depicts Price Albert, the beloved husband of Queen Victoria. He died on December 14th, 1861 and in February the following year, the first mention of a memorial to his memory was considered in a council meeting, reported in the Perthshire Courier on February 11th. In that meeting a proposal was put forward to replace the “ugly affair” at the top of South Street with a red granite fountain in Prince Albert’s name. A bust in the council offices was rejected because “none but the privileged few would see it”. Fundraising began then, and in a meeting in May it was recorded that the Provost asked the Guildry Incorporation to make a donation, among others, and they had proposed at their own meeting to donate no more than £20 towards the cost. Two other incorporations had been approached, but had neglected to name a sum until the Guildry and Glovers Incorporations had made their pledges. In a letter from William Brodie in February 1863, £300 was considered enough for a life-sized statue of the Prince, or an 8ft high statue excluding the pedestal. The stone could be delivered by Redhill Quarry at cost price, which was £280, so very little money was still needed to cover the cost of a larger memorial. The statue was proposed to be placed on the North Inch, where it would be more prominently displayed. A few groups wanted a reading room instead, feeling that an institution would not only commemorate the Prince, but would also add to Perth’s reputation. The cost of such a room was estimated at £2000 and there was no guarantee the building would be permanent, so the committee voted for a statue on the North Inch. Brodie was working on the statue by the time the council met in December, and the Perthshire Courier reported on the design the 22nd. He would be dressed in the robes of a Knight of the Thistle, the highest award of chivalry in Scotland, and holding the design of the Great Exhibition of 1851. Prince Alfred had already visited Brodie twice; once to comment on the design of Albert’s face and dress, and once to approve of the new design, and these visit continued throughout Brodie’s work. The story did not end there, however. In March 1864 there was a committee meeting to discuss the possibility of either moving the stone statue to the City Hall to protect it, or having it cast in bronze instead. As with the proposal for a reading room, however, it was deemed too expensive. The committee were already around £150-£200 short of the price of the existing plan, which now included a railing that is no longer in place, so could not afford a far pricier bronze version. They had pledges of another £170 and less than £300 at hand, but a bronze statue would cost another £600. By the time the memorial was complete in early August, the statue was 9ft high, and the pedestal was reported as 13ft tall. It was time to plan for the inauguration of the statue by Queen Victoria, planned for August of that year. She had seen a photograph of the statue and approved of it, and agreed to visit it on her way to Balmoral. Queen Victoria visited Perth for around an hour on 30th August 1864 to inaugurate the memorial. It had been erected in Perth on the 18th. Her royal train arrived in Perth Train Station at 8:40am, and while it was there no one was allowed access to the station. She was escorted in a procession of three carriages from the station, through Marshall Place and on to the site on North Inch, the streets lined with military. This visit made William Brodie possibly the first Scottish sculptor to have his work inaugurated by royalty and he enjoyed a meal with the members of the council who had commissioned the work. Once complete, the queen’s procession returned to the station through Athole Street and resumed her journey north, and Perth had its memorial to Prince Albert, which remains today. Sources – Perthshire Courier newspapers held by Perth and Kinross Archives, AK Bell Library, Perth

Posted by CharlieFoxtrot on 17-08-2016

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The Kiln, 2 Buttquoy Place and Button Stable

We have lived in this house for almost 30 years. About 4 years ago we had the stable at the bottom of the garden renovated. We understand this was one of several stables in Kirkwall used in the past possibly by farmers coming into town on business and to stable horses/carts. We don't know why it is called The Button or indeed why our house is called The Kiln. We have found several pieces of carved red sandstone in our garden and stable and assume a connection in the area with the building of the cathedral. One of these carved pieces, found in the stable, has a distinctive cross carved in it - a mason's mark?

Posted by Judith Swannie on 06-08-2016

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Masonic Hall

Masonic Hall, with panel above door dated 1885.

Posted by George Geddes on 05-08-2016

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Site of Kirkwall Garden Dig 2016

Radio Orkney

Posted by DannyD on 05-08-2016

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Frank McAuley

In August 2016, my mother Rose Hamilton and I are visiting the Theipval Memorial at the Somme where her Uncle Frank is among the 70,000 listed dead from the battle with no known grave. Private Frank McAuley of Kilsyth, Scotland, was killed on 9th September 1916 in the final stages of the Battle of the Somme. Frank (22) was with the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers as they fought for the towns of Guillemont and Ginchy. His father John was a miner at the local colliery but when Frank was killed, he and his wife Bridget were quite broken and moved into Glasgow where my Gran who was working at a munitions factory took care of them. She later named one of her children, Rose's twin brother, after her beloved Frank, but sadly he died before his second birthday.

Posted by Cathie Russell on 01-08-2016

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Memorial to the battle of the Bell o' the Braes

Designer – Andy Hillhouse Sculptor – Roddy McDowall The monument is topped by a contemporary (1297) war helmet, with a sword design identical to the weapon displayed in the National Wallace Monument in Stirling. Located near Glasgow Cathedral, in Glasgow's necropolis, the memorial commemorates a battle with an English army, towards the end of the 13th century. Known as the battle of the Bell O' The Braes, it is believed to have taken place on a steep slope close to the memorial, near where the High Street and Rottenrow now meet. The battle was between an English force led by Earl Percy, and Wallace's troops. When Percy was killed, his English forces deserted the field (fleeing perhaps as far as Bothwell). Unveiled, 9 July 2016.

Posted by Ewen Smith on 01-08-2016

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Family Home

House built in 1905 and subdivided in 1950.

Posted by Kath Kane on 01-08-2016

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Tenant 1930

Mrs Isabella Brennan (widowed), Coal Merchant, lived here with her family according to the 1930 Valuation Roll. Her previous address was 74 Hyndland Street. She married Charles Brennan 1887 at St Peter's Church at Hyndland Street.

Posted by Ltill on 01-08-2016

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New Academy

This school is built on the site of the playing field of the old school.

Posted by Peigi on 30-07-2016

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A welcome break...

I used to wonder what this small brick block was for, until one night when I was on a bus passing it.... The driver stopped and switched off the engine, saying he was going there for a pee! Now I know! There are more dotted around Edinburgh's bus routes.

Posted by Swaff23 on 27-07-2016

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New Use of Building

The station building has been renovated over the past 5 years and is now in use as a suite of office desk spaces (with computer and phone and internet access) for occasional or regular use by the public or small businesses. The "Newhaven Station" sign has been recreated and painted in blue and cream to match the repainting of the building. There is currently no access to the station level from the former railway platform level, but this may change as the former garage building next door is being redeveloped into a supermarket at the station level, with a nursery at the station platform level which may need access from street level. The railway path itself is a popular cycle path between Roseburn and Leith (which I use regularly!).

Posted by Swaff23 on 27-07-2016

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Previous residents

James Angus 1894-1911 Margaret Modie Turnbull 1930 (tenant) Trustees of the late Alexander Turnbull 1930 (owner) Sources: Edinburgh PO Directory, 1930 Valuation Roll VR100 / 627 / 156

Posted by Fergus Smith on 27-07-2016

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Granton Community Garden

First of several corner sites adopted (with Council permission) by the local community of Granton in North Edinburgh for the benefit of local community members. As well as growing lots of great veg and fruit and trialing some newer crops (quinoa, wheat in an urban setting, various multi-cultural veg) we are holding community meals (BBQ in late summer, Burns Night etc) and working with local firms, schools, libraries and nurseries to promote an understanding of growing fruit and veg, and equally important, cooking and eating it!

Posted by Bryony on 27-07-2016

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Building Title

The title used is about 19 years out of date. The building hasn't been used by the Scottish Office since the devolution of Government to Scotland in the late nineties, when the building became a main building for the Scottish Executive. That organisation changed its name to the Scottish Government following the SNP coming to power, so VQ is a Scottish Government Building, though other governmental organisations are accommodated within the building.

Posted by Swaff23 on 27-07-2016

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My Memories of Stenhouse Mansion

I was born in Stenhouse Drive in 1933 and stayed there until 1948. At that time Stenhouse Mansion was a derelict building with a greyhound track in the grounds. As well as greyhound racing there were boxing matches and pony and trap racing held there. We used to get to watch all this for free by sitting on the walls overlooking the racetrack. These races usually took place on Saturdays. At the times of the races the streets were lined with taxis. We used to call those that attended the 'mugs fur the dugs'. Where the filling station is now (2016) there were farm workers cottages. Stenhouse Mill Lane, which at that time led to Longstone, was known locally as 'The Piggy W'yse.

Posted by Ben989 on 27-07-2016

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Previous residents

Miss V M Anderson 1894-1907 Rev Archibald Lamont BD 1908-1909 Edwin James Fyfe 1930 Sources: Edinburgh PO Directory, 1930 Valuation Roll VR100 / 627 / 156

Posted by Fergus Smith on 27-07-2016

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Previous residents

James Tait 1894-1900 Mrs Tait 1901-1903 Miss Tait 1904-1906 James Scott Henderson 1930 (tenant) Trustees of the late George Henderson 1930 (owner) Sources: Edinburgh PO Directory, 1930 Valuation Roll VR100 / 627 / 156

Posted by Fergus Smith on 27-07-2016

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Previous residents

Delme Maconochie 1893-1904 Mrs Maconochie 1905-1911 James Macdonald Walker 1930 Sources: Edinburgh PO Directory, 1930 Valuation Roll VR100 / 627 / 156

Posted by Fergus Smith on 27-07-2016

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Previous residents

James Philip (or Philp) SSC 1893-1908 Mrs James Philp 1908-1911 John W W Philp 1908-1911 John Galloway 1930 Sources: Edinburgh PO Directory, 1930 Valuation Roll VR100 / 627 / 156

Posted by Fergus Smith on 27-07-2016

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Previous residents

Angus Mcdonald 1893-1901 Captain C S Watson 1901-1905 James Lennie 1906 Stuart C Lorimer 1907-1911 Arthur Sanderson Robertson 1930 Sources: Edinburgh PO Directory, 1930 Valuation Roll VR100 / 627 / 156

Posted by Fergus Smith on 27-07-2016

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Previous residents

Mrs Lawrie 1893-1894 Mrs Armour 1895-1903 William Peters 1904-1911 George Somerville 1930 Sources: Edinburgh PO Directories, 1930 Valuation Roll VR100 / 627 / 156

Posted by Fergus Smith on 27-07-2016

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Changing Southside

In the late 1970's after years of planning blight due to the proposed Bridges Relief Road, most of the Southside's original buildings had been demolished. One of the last to go was at the corner of Saint Leonard's Street and Rankeillor Street where we find Interesting Cars and Kinnear's Timber Supplies.

Posted by colin.i2 on 27-07-2016

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Tollcross Primary School

The school building is shared with Tollcross Community Centre. This is a City of Edinburgh Council facility under Community Learning and Development, where a wealth of community activities are run and many local interest groups meet, such as the DRBs Scottish Women's History Group. There is wheelchair access and creche available. Added July 2016

Posted by Carol on 27-07-2016

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Previous residents

James W Bowhill 1892-1900 W A Mackenzie MA, MD, MRCPE 1901-1911 James Walter Macdonald 1930 Sources: Edinburgh PO Directories, 1930 Valuation Roll VR100 / 627 / 156

Posted by Fergus Smith on 27-07-2016

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Re-purposed police call box

This police box is now a cafe.

Posted by Peigi on 14-07-2016

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Inflatable tennis court

The dark turquoise domed structure in the aerial photograph is an inflatable tennis court.

Posted by Peigi on 14-07-2016

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Tenement

Sandstone tenement c1890.

Posted by Peigi on 14-07-2016

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Shipmaster's home

Recorded in the 1915 Aberdeen Weekly Journal as being home to Jean Rose, widow of William Erskine, shipmaster.

Posted by Bryony on 12-07-2016

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The restoration

Extracts of text from 1983 souvenir brochure SSHA 394 Gallowgate On the the occasion of the visit of HER MAJESTY THE QUEEN To Calton On Friday 1st July 1983 The Scottish Special Housing Association’s interest in Calton stems from its participation in the Glasgow Eastern Area Renewal urban regeneration project. As part of its contribution the Association has built in the Calton estate, some 300 new homes and has modernised a further 400 dwellings. Sixty-one of these are especially adapted for the use of the elderly and five homes are designed for wheelchair users. … The building to be saved The Scottish Special Housing Association’s redevelopment role in Calton provided a unique opportunity to save and restore a building known as 394 Gallowgate which dates from 1771 and was recognised by the Historic Buildings Council forScotland is a fine and very rare example in Glasgow of a vernacular 18th century brick tenement building. It was oncle probably part of a courtyard complex on the main road from the City to the south. Of particular interest is its construction in brickwork, which makes it one of the earliest examples of its type in Scotland, whilst an additional feature of historic interest is the apparent originality of its turnpike stair, also of brick, a feature which is commonly believed to have been added to tenements during 19th century improvements. The building also contains several other attractive features, characteristic of its age and type, particularly the nepus gable containing two windows and supporting a chimney head, rusticated quoins and rolled skew putts. In 1980 the building was in a dilapidated condition and early proposals for the area suggested demolition. However at this time the Secretary of State fro Scotland listed the building as a Category B listed building of special architectural and historic interest. … The proposals implemented Within the external shell, 394 has been completely gutted except from some internal walls at ground level. On each of the four levels a new flat has been formed within the shell. The turnpike stair at the rear of the building provides access to the upper flats. … Architect: T.J. Reilly Engineer: R.M. Brown Quantity surveyor: A McKinnon Consultants: Thomas Laurie Associates Contractor: Unit Construction Company Limited

Posted by KayMcM on 04-07-2016

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family business

James B Rolinson was my grandfather. He set up the business there in 1935. My father and uncles joined the business after WW2. As a teenager I worked there on Saturdays and school holidays. I remember going up the spiral staircase at the back of what we now know was a brick-built vernacular tenement which is where they kept the safe. It was very dark and spooky. I used to take the takings in a leather pouch to the British Linen Bank one block away along the road. Many customers paid in cash and it's the only time I ever saw £100 notes. After 1977 the business moved to Mount Vernon and finally closed about 1980.

Posted by KayMcM on 26-06-2016

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"Mysterious Affair in Edinburgh: brother makes Startling Discovery"

"MAN DEAD AND SISTER SUFFERING FROM POISONING. While a man was going to call upon his sister Margaret Fairbairn, 9 Summerhall Square, Edinburgh, he found he was unable to gain entry to the house, but he got a little boy to go in through the window and open the door. The door of the bedroom, where his sister was, was secured from the inside, but the sister's nine-year-old daughter opened it. Upon entering the room he found that his sister was lying in bed ill, and a friend named Alexander Haines, Gladstone Place, Leith, was lying on the floor close by. A broken flower pot was lying beside him, and it looked as if it had been knocked down when Haines fell. On calling in a doctor he certified that the man was dead. The woman was taking to the Infirmary suffering from poison. The child was not detained. The child, it appears, had gone home about half-past three. Her mother was unwell at the time, and Haines was sitting beside the bed speaking to her. So far no light has been thrown on the mystery." From the Evening Telegraph, Tuesday February 1st, 1921.

Posted by AnnaM on 07-06-2016

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Tillicoultry Allotments (original est 1933)

These allotments were established in 1933, making them one of the earliest in Clackmannanshire. The site is still maintained as allotments with just under 30 plots on site.

Posted by warrenbailie on 30-05-2016

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Queensferry Road

Queensferry Road was the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Queensferry Road

Queensferry Road was the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Queensferry Road

Queensferry Road was the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Queensferry Road

Queensferry Road was the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Queensferry Road

Queensferry Road was the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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St John's Primary School

St John's Primary School took part in an SUP project in Spring 2016. Most of their work focused on Queensferry Road, Rosyth.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Queensferry Road

Queensferry Road was the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Queensferry Road

Queensferry Road was the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Queensferry Road

Queensferry Road was the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Queensferry Road

Queensferry Road was the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Queensferry Road

Queensferry Road was the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Backmarch Road

Queensferry Road and surrounding streets were the subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Hamilton Place

Queensferry Road and surrounding streets were subject of St John's Primary School's SUP project in Spring 2016.

Posted by SUPschools on 20-05-2016

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Cable Duct Ventiator - Not Gas Main Ventilator

Circa 1905. Cast-iron Art Nouveau style ventilator, sited on traffic island at head of Justice Mill Lane, at junction with Holburn Street. The ventilator is not for gas but marks the end of the cable subway running from here, under Crown Street, to the former Electricity Works and Tram Car Depot in Millburn and Crown Streets, to which it provided necessary ventilation.

Posted by Florance on 26-04-2016

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Bakers

George Thomson & Co were bakers located at 45-47 St Nicholas Street. This street is now the site of the St Nicholas Shopping Centre. The main building in the picture is St Nicholas Kirk.

Posted by Florance on 24-04-2016

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"Soapy" Ogston

The soap works in the Gallowgate were owned by the Ogston family including Col James 'Soapy’ Ogston. The Ogston family also have links to Ardoe House and Kildrummy Castle.

Posted by Florance on 24-04-2016

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Rope Makers

This company of rope makers dates back to 1780 and had a number of locations in Aberdeen. It moved to Queen Street in 1939. No current details of the company. Ref "The Doric Columns" website

Posted by Florance on 24-04-2016

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Harvesters Link

Re-opened pedestrian route under the railway between between Wester Hailes shopping centre and new Wester Hailes healthy living centre.

Posted by Eoghan Howard on 23-04-2016

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Festival of Architecture 2016

The Scottish Government designated the year 2016 as the Year of Innovation, Architecture and Design. 2016 was also the centenary year of The Royal Incorporation of Architects in Scotland (RIAS). To celebrate this, the RIAS curated and coordinated the Festival of Architecture 2016, which was supported by VisitScotland and Creative Scotland. The year-long Festival encompassed over 150 partners and 400+ events throughout Scotland.

Posted by leadeye on 23-04-2016

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Building Naming

This tower block at 2 Hailesland Park was named Midcairn after extensive refurbishment in the early 1990's

Posted by Eoghan Howard on 23-04-2016

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Building Naming

This tower block at 1 Hailesland Park was renamed Kilncroft after extensive refurbishment in the early 1990's.

Posted by Eoghan Howard on 23-04-2016

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Public Launch

This is thought to be the first digital totem pole in Scotland, if not wider. It was publically "launched" by the Lord Provost of Edinburgh in December 2012. A video of this event can be accessed here WH Totem Pole Launch

Posted by Eoghan Howard on 23-04-2016

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Argylle Cottage

This was the schoolmaster's house to the adjacent school.

Posted by Peigi on 23-04-2016

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Change of use

This building has been converted to Satrosphere Science Science (more recently re-named Aberdeen Science Centre). It is a family-friendly science centre open to the public.

Posted by SUP Training on 23-04-2016

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Now demolished

Aberdeen prison has been demolished 2015/ 2016 to make way for housing.

Posted by SUP Training on 23-04-2016

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Building Naming

This tower block at 3 Hailesland Park was named Drovers Bank after extensive refurbishment in the early 1990's

Posted by Eoghan Howard on 23-04-2016

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Filmhouse Cinema 1

The main screen at the Filmhouse (Cinema 1) is now where the main church hall used to be. The stained glass window is still in situ.

Posted by leadeye on 23-04-2016

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Odeon Cinema

This location is now an Odeon Cinema. On top of operating under the Odeon banner, the cinema also screens films as part of the Edinburgh International Film Festival.

Posted by leadeye on 23-04-2016

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DUCHESS ANNE’S HOSPITAL

DUCHESS ANNE’S HOSPITAL Duchess Anne Hamilton was the 3rd Duchess of Hamilton. She lived from 6 January 1631 to 17 October 1716, and she is remembered as “Good Duchess Anne”. She was a noblewoman who rebuilt Hamilton Palace and did a great deal to assist in the development of the town by building a school, an almshouse, a woollen factory and a spinning school. Duchess Anne’s Hospital was an old house that stood at the corner of Castle Street and New Wynd. Today the site of the Almshouse is occupied by a house across from where the entrance to the Asda car park is. The hospital, or Almshouse as it was known, was occupied by a number of poor families. I was built around the middle of the 17th century as a hospital and had been occupied up until the beginning of the 18th century where it became disused as a hospital and ever since it had been occupied as a dwelling house. In the year 1858 there were still 6 or 7 individuals who were receiving 8s from the house of Hamilton in view of a house rent. The slum building was later demolished.

Posted by Garry McCallum on 17-04-2016

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Rosyth Crossroads tiny building

This tiny polygonal building is currently used as an information point but has had other uses such as a veterinary practice and hairdresser. The hipped roof is slated with a terracotta ridge and painted roughcast exterior walls.

Posted by Peigi on 15-04-2016

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A. Cameron and Co.

Not to be confused with F. A. Cameron Ltd. in Church Street. My mother worked in this store from 1975 to the early 1980s, having previously worked at Copland and Lye in Glasgow. I remember all cash transactions were manual with handwritten receipts and big brass vacuum tubes that took away notes and delivered change. On the rare occasion I was allowed in the staff room I wondered how people could stand it as everyone smoked like chimneys. There was a piece of local character: a tramp who I think was called Benny. Every year the Camerons staff would make him a Christmas parcel with new clothes and treats.

Posted by Peigi on 07-04-2016

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31-3 Harbour Road, Eyemouth

Contrary to outward appearances this is not the building that appears in archive photographs pre 1980. An earlier building on the site was entirely demolished and rebuilt in the early 1980s to a specification provided by local architects Bain Swan that largely mimicked the external appearances of the original building. The current building houses a cafe and dive boat charter business Marinequest.

Posted by DannyD on 07-04-2016

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Pictures of Tayport Harbour

Pictures 34 ,37 and 40 taken in July 1943 seem to show the harbour with the RAF Air Sea Rescue launches that were stationed there during World War 2. My father George Herbert "Bert" Throw was stationed at Tayport with the Air Sea Rescue Service during the war. The service rescued downed pilots and seamen including enemy personnel in the Tay Estuary and North Sea as far as Norway. I visited Tayport in New Year 2016 to see where my father had been stationed and made enquiries beforehand. It seems the slipway which one of the launches is pictured by (half way down the harbour wall) is still known as the RAF Slipway and a local councillor said that he remembered the launches still being operational in the 1950s - confirmed by RAF documentation. My mother also lived there and my parents who were married just before the outbreak of war remembered very happy times there. The pictures of 1943 show the railway, now disappeared. Much of the area which looked like old railway marshalling yards has now been occupied by housing.

Posted by Robert Throw on 15-03-2016

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1890s - 1900s

My Grandfather Alexander was superintendant of these baths. Apparently he was a keen swimmer himself, and one of a band who would swim between islands in the Forth of Clyde. Does anyone have any information about this activity?

Posted by stuartromsey on 05-02-2016

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The Rubber Company

My grandfather, Joseph Gorst, was MD of the Rubber Company of Scotland up until his death in 1959. The company was sold soon afterwards to H K Porter.

Posted by Andy Gorst on 07-11-2015

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The Golf Tavern

The best pub in town.

Posted by live25live25 on 02-06-2015

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